google-site-verification: google65e716d80989ba07.html The Armchair Genealogist: March 2013

Want to Build a Family History Legacy Book

Monday Morning Mentions


Monday Morning Mentions is an opportunity to reflect on the events of the week at the Armchair Genealogist and in the blogging and book community. Over my morning cappuccino, I will take the opportunity to share with you some of my favourite blogs posts this week and give a nod to my peers.




You can also find me on Facebook. Stop by and leave a message. I often will link some great finds there as well. You can also follow me on twitter at @LynnPal or my twitter paper The Armchair Genealogist Journal.



At the Armchair Genealogist this week, posts included the following:




Internet Genealogy – a great genealogy or internet tip that will benefit any armchair genealogist.

This week's mention: 


What is a Geneablogger? This post by Dear Myrtle was just brimming with pride and respect for her fellow bloggers and it certainly made me proud to be a Geneablogger. 

This week, Elizabeth Shown Mills offers up Quick Lesson 16: Speculation, Hypothesis, Interpretation & Proof on her website Evidence Explained. 

Considering turning your genealogy passion into a business, read this post by Michelle at Ancestoring's Ask a Genealogist, Taking on Paid Clients


Writing Family History - great advice or information on writing your family history.

This week’s mention:

The Genealogist's Muse: Asking Why, Marian S. Regan at her new website mariansregan.com discusses 'Story' and takes a closer look at the why and how of a story and walks us through an example from her own family history. 

Story Spark #8, I Remember.... Tami at Your Story Coach, guides us through creating a database of story starters. 



Social Media for the Genealogist - this will include social media advice and learning opportunities from experts both inside and outside of the genealogy industry. 

This week's mention: 

So have you taken a look at the newest social networking venture known as Vine. Vine allows you to share up to 6-second long looping videos with sound from your smartphone. Popular among celebrities, actors,  I'm wondering how genealogist may make use this interesting app. You can learn more about Vine through this Make Use of post with the recent updates from Vine. Vine Users Can Now Share Videos Easily & Embed Them On The Web.

New Genealogy Blog – we will tip our hat to a newcomer who impresses us right out of the box 

This week's mention: 

This week stop by and take a look at  The Ancestors Have Spoken by Yvette Porter Moore.  Yvette takes on this blog from the perspective of an Adoptee trying to understand the family that birth her and the family that adopted her. 
Podcasts and Digital Magazines, Google+ Hangouts etc.  We will capture all the latest in podcasts, digital magazines and the like right here. 

The Lost Art of Note-Taking, this week's podcast from Michael Hyatt, I thought it was extremely beneficial to the family historian, especially for those of you who attend a lot of conferences. 

Fieldstone Common Podcast -This past week on Fieldstone Common, Marian Pierre-Louis interviews Prof. Ava Chamberlain, author of The Notorious Elizabeth Tuttle: Marriage, Murder, and Madness in the Family of Jonathan Edwards.

What's Up Genealogy? Caroline Pointer interviews Mike Davis from StoryPress. 

Monday's with Dear Myrtle - if you missed last week's Google+ Hangout, you can catch the recording  here. 


The Webinar Watch - Each week we will list upcoming webinars mostly in genealogy, but occasionally I come across one for writing or social media I think is beneficial, I'll be sure to share it here. Will also add hangouts to the list. 

This week's webinars: 

Working with Dates in RootsMagic hosted and presented by RootsMagic. Tuesday April 2nd.FREE. 

Evidence: Guidelines for Evaluating Genealogical Evidence presented by Linda Woodward Geiger, hosted by Legacy Family Tree. Wednesday April 3. FREE. 

Breakdown Brick Walls with Home Sources presented by Denise Levenick and hosted by Southern California Genealogical Society. Saturday April 6th. FREE.


Other Great Round-ups

You can find more new genealogy bloggers at Thomas' list of New Genealogy Blogs at Geneabloggers.

For other great reads, Randy at Genea-Musings offers the Best of the Genea-Blogs

Read Friday Finds by Julie Cahill at GenBlog

Dan Curtis, Professional Personal Historian always puts together some interesting selections in Monday's Link Round-Up.

British and Irish Genealogy blog offers lots of goodies, This week brings Genealogy News for Mar 29th.

And Jana Last lists some favorites on Follow Friday -- Fab Finds for Mar 29th 2013 by Jana Last on Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog.

Here's a new round-up to follow, Two Nerdy History Girls offers us a weekly round-up. I think you'll find them fascinating. This week's Breakfast Links: Week of March 18th.

And John at Transylvanian Dutch brings us his Weekly Genealogy Picks.


Have a great genealogy week, keep researching and writing!

The Timid Family Historian


One of the first actions we are encouraged to carry out when we begin our family history is to interview the living. Our living family members are the links to the past. They hold the memories that we so desperately need to acquire to help shape our research. We need to obtain from them their experiential accounts of their life and their impressions and understandings of the ancestors they had the privilege to know.

For a timid, introverted family historian this can be an insurmountable task.  Some family historians are so uncomfortable with this task, it leads to procrastination. Sometimes that procrastination results in an interview never taking place. Frequently, the relative who holds so many memories passes away, while we are busy overcoming our interview anxieties. We make excuses; we want to learn a little more about the process of genealogy. We want to find this document or that fact. But generally, our excuses are just that excuses because we are just too intimidated by the family history interview.


Interviewing Tips for the Timid Family Historian


1. Preparation is an integral part in overcoming your anxieties. When the time arrives to sit down with your relative, preparation will not eliminate your nerves completely. However, being well prepared will present a professional impression and set you up for acquiring the information you need in spite of your nerves. Preparation takes place in three key areas.



  • Preparing the right atmosphere for the interview 
  • Compiling the right interview questions
  • Having the right tools available to capture and record your interview




2. Understanding the skills of a great interviewer is important to quieting your fears. Learning to listen, and acquiring the talent required to guide an interview are key to becoming comfortable with all the possibilities you could face in your meeting. You want to learn how to handle the interviewee that wanders off subject, what to do during those awkward silences and how to dig for deeper, more detailed answers while on the fly. We are witness to excellent interviewers everyday on TV. Watch these masters at work and take note of how they handle some of the most difficult interview subjects. Learn from their example.

3. Practice, Practice, Practice is the key to overcoming your anxieties when conducting the family history interview. How do you get that experience? Start with your spouse, your children, your parents, family members, anyone you feel comfortable with and then move on to more difficult family members. Don’t wait too long. Ideally, it’s best to start with your eldest family members but if that terrorizes you, get a few practice interviews under your belt with someone who intimates you a little less. After the interview, ask them to analyze your performance.  Get some honest feedback so you can learn from the experience. Video tape your interview, watch it back and see how you could improve on your interviewing skills.


While I’m not the Wizard of Oz and I can’t grant you a badge of courage to help you accomplish your family history interviews, I can help you be well prepared when it comes to carrying out these conversations. If you want to learn more about how to conduct a family history interview download my free ebook.

Here’s what you’ll learn:

What is an Oral History Interview - We discuss how the interview process can add life to your stories. 


Preparing for the Interview- You'll learn how to prepare for the interview to get the results you are seeking, including the tools you'll require to get the job done. 


Conducting the Interview- Master the skills you'll need to guide the interview like a pro.


The Long Distance Interview - We take a look at all the options for conducting an interview when geography is a barrier.


Conducting Group Interviews - Once you mastered the one-on-one interview you'll want to advance to the group interview, where the rewards can be plentiful. 


Asking the Difficult Questions- Every family has it's share of secrets and skeletons, learn how to ask those difficult questions and handle your most intimidating relatives. 


After the Interview - We'll review how to save and archive your interviews for future generations. 


Plus 130 Interview Questions ready to use with advice on how to construct your own specific and relevant questions



Download Your Free Ebook!  



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Turn Family Lines into Story Lines!



There was a lot of talk last week coming out of Rootstech 2013 with regards to  the importance of story and enlisting its assistance in sharing our family history.

I was thrilled that the theme of the conference was storytelling.  Great emphasis was placed on moving beyond the dates, names and places in our family history to create these stories. Here at the Armchair Genealogist we’ve been drinking that Kool-Aid for years. However, I’m not here to declare an 'I told you so.'  I’m here to say let’s get to work and offer you some help.


We’ve all have been nodding our heads in agreement for these past few days about how we need to focus on the stories to engage our family and draw others into our passion. This translates into finding a way to turn our dry family history data into engaging stories and for many that is indeed a very overwhelming challenge.


Some may think that dropping documents and photos into a book or video will culminate into a family history story.



The documents and photos of your family history are not a story! 



Let me elaborate. They support the story and they help reveal the story, but they are not the whole story. The facts contained within those pictures and documents are central to shaping your stories. However, your family history tales will begin to emerge when you can paint a picture of the time and place where your ancestors lived. Your story will materialize when your ancestor’s character is brought to life through their dress, mannerisms and personality. The account of your ancestor's life will emerge when you present a struggle and a resolution wrapped up in emotion and a universal truth that relates to your audience. Then you will have a story.


We are seeing many wonderful new tech apps that are going to make it easier for you to present and share those tales. Reel Genie, Treelines, Saving Memories Forever and StoryPress are but a few. They will all give you the ability to drop your family history data, photos and documents into a shareable format along with your narrative. They are all wonderful options for preserving and presenting your family history. However, they will not write the story for you. They place you in the unique position of being a storyteller. Now we need to learn how to tell a great story.


At Rootstech, we were given front row seats to some master storytellers.  I encourage you to watch, Syd Lieberman in Thursday’s keynote address. Also, enjoy Kim Wietkamp from the live streaming lecture Tell It Again


Regardless of whether you are writing a family history book or a family history blog, whether you wish to make a video or audio recording for future generations, you first must understand how to identify, arrange and present your family history data in a story format. This is at the essence of what we encourage here at The Armchair Genealogist. Our Family History Blog to Book Project, Our Guide to Writing Family History and The Family History Writing Challenge are all vehicles to help you to become a better storyteller regardless of how you intend to deliver that story. We provide tools, education and motivation to help you find and shape those facts into a shareable and engaging plan. 


If you are interested in learning more about turning your family lines into story lines, and creating  emotional stories your family can relate to then I encourage you to sign up for our newsletter. 


 Storylines is monthly newsletter  dedicated to helping you skillfully tell your stories. Regardless of whether you plan to write or record, this e-zine will offer you opportunities to learn how to caress those dates, names and places into a creative account of your ancestor’s lives. 

Turn Family Lines into Storylines



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Monday Morning Mentions



Monday Morning Mentions is an opportunity to reflect on the events of the week at the Armchair Genealogist and in the blogging and book community. Over my morning cappuccino, I will take the opportunity to share with you some of my favourite blogs posts this week and give a nod to my peers.




You can also find me on Facebook. Stop by and leave a message. I often will link some great finds there as well. You can also follow me on twitter at @LynnPal or my twitter paper The Armchair Genealogist Journal.



At the Armchair Genealogist this week, posts included the following:




Internet Genealogy – a great genealogy or internet tip that will benefit any armchair genealogist.

This week's mention: 


This first post by Elyse at Elyse's Genealogy Blog desperately needed to be said. My two cents: If all the 20,30,40 year veterans of genealogy had met with the condescension that these young people meet with today, I would wonder how genealogy exists at all.  This post also sets the stage for what was too be a large part of the theme at this week's Rootstech conference, engaging the young through storytelling and technology.  Be sure to read Young People Aren't Interested in Genealogy? 

Speaking of Rootstech, there were many great blog posts coming out of the festivities. I found a couple of bloggers that I felt really got to the heart of the conference and went at it from the boots on the ground sort of mentality. My two favorites this week were:

Mike Maglio of Origin Hunters

Mike not only wrote for his own blog at Origin Hunters,  Imagine: A New Kind of Family History  

He also wrote 3 great posts for The In-Depth Genealogist.  

The second blogger that scores high marks for connecting with me at home this weekend has to be Jill from the blog, Geniaus. She was everywhere, and she captured some great interviews, had her own lectures to deliver and created a steady stream of posts. Jill an Aussie blogger, started the minute her feet hit American soil and never took a breath. Here's a selection of my favourites.  

A Steinway at Rootstech - her interview with David Pogue! Nice score! David was the keynote speaker on Saturday morning. Other great and diverse interviews include Aussies at Rootstech , Else and Alec at Rootstech and Heather at Rootstech. There are plenty of posts with tons of pictures, so spend sometime at Geniaus catching up on Rootstech. I'm sure there will be some post Rootstech articles on the way. 

If you missed any of the 3 day live streaming lectures you can watch them all here at your leisure  Please don't skip over the keynotes, they were lively, inspirational and thought provoking. Really! As of Sunday evening Saturday's lectures and keynote were not available but I'm sure they will be shortly. 

If you want to know who else was blogging at Rootstech, Randy Seaver at Genea-Musings has a wonderful round-up of posts and highlights a list from all the bloggers. RootsTech 2013 Geneabloggers Review.

And in non-Rootstech news, Angela Packer McGhie from Adventures in Genealogy Education shares some lessons learned in her posted Unexpected Lessons from Tom Jones Part 1 and Part 2



Writing Family History - great advice or information on writing your family history.

This week’s mention:

I really connected this week with a post by Allison Versterfelt , guest blogger at Jeff Goins. Is Your Writing Timeless? Some food for thought as we move forward with our own family history writing. 


Social Media for the Genealogist - this will include social media advice and learning opportunities from experts both inside and outside of the genealogy industry. 

This week's mention: 

These days much of the social media streams are filled with self-promotion, and I have nothing against it, I use this approach myself but I also offset it with another approach, something I'm a big believer in and practice daily. Want to know what it is?  Read A Surprisingly Satisfying Alternative to Self-Promotion by way of writer Jeff Goins. 


New Genealogy Blog – we will tip our hat to a newcomer who impresses us right out of the box 

This week's mention: 

 This week's blog deserves to be recognized  And while I am unable to identify the writer of this blog, the writer is busy identifing 102 Confederate soldiers who died in Lexington, Kentucky during the Civil War. The blog owner stumbled upon a Confederate cemetery and chose to honor the men in this cemetery by telling their stories one at a time. Perfect!  Each post is about a different soldier be sure to welcome Ghosts in Gray! 


Books that Move and Matter - each week we will feature an ebook or print book with the family historian in mind. It may come as a great source of information, for research or writing or playing to our historical interests, or may just be a great read I think genealogists will love.

This week's feature book is:


Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries by Maureen A. Taylor. Maureen is well known in the family history circles for her expert ability to identify the clues in old photos. She shares her expertise in this book and helps you to identify the clues in your old family photos, helping you put names and faces to your photos as a means to uncovering your family history. 

Podcasts and Digital Magazines etc.  I've added a new item to Monday Morning Mentions. We will capture all the latest in podcasts, digital magazines and the like right here. 

Be sure to catch Marian's Fieldstone Common podcast this week, Hidden History of the Boston Irish with  Peter F. Stevens. 

The Webinar Watch - Each week we will list upcoming webinars mostly in genealogy, but occasionally I come across one for writing or social media I think is beneficial, I'll be sure to share it here. Will also add hangouts to the list. 

This week's webinars: 


No webinars this week!  


Other Great Round-ups

You can find more new genealogy bloggers at Thomas' list of New Genealogy Blogs at Geneabloggers.

For other great reads, Randy at Genea-Musings offers the Best of the Genea-Blogs

Read Friday Finds by Julie Cahill at GenBlog

Dan Curtis, Professional Personal Historian always puts together some interesting selections in Monday's Link Round-Up.

British and Irish Genealogy blog offers lots of goodies, This week brings Genealogy News for Mar 22nd.

And Jana Last lists some favorites on Follow Friday -- Fab Finds for Mar 22nd 2013 by Jana Last on Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog.

Here's a new round-up to follow, Two Nerdy History Girls offers us a weekly round-up. I think you'll find them fascinating. This week's Breakfast Links: Week of March 18th.

And John at Transylvanian Dutch brings us his Weekly Genealogy Picks.


Have a great genealogy week, keep researching and writing!
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RootsTech Conference: 10 Tips to Make the Most of Your Virtual Experience

 
Thursday marks the start of the RootsTech Conference in Salt Lake City. While I’m a little saddened that I can’t be there in person this year, I’m thrilled to be attending virtually through the live streaming lectures.

RootsTech celebrates its 3rd year and combines the worlds of genealogy and technology through this unique conference. The focus of many of the lectures and workshops is to demonstrate the various tools and tips on combining your technology world with your family history research. Over the course of Thursday, Friday and Saturday of this week more than two dozen lectures will be presented to the online community, while they are happening live in Salt Lake City. It was through these lectures during the first year that I was inspired to attend last year. Unfortunately, the timing did not make it possible this year. However, I’m quite content to be watching from my armchair.

To watch the live streaming videos, check out the schedule and just show up at RootsTech.org on the appointed time. There will be easy prompts available to instruct you when the lectures are ready to start. The nice thing about live streaming, unlike webinars there is no pre-registration and there is no limited seating. You don’t have to worry about getting there late and not getting a seat. You have a front row seat reserved for you for each lecture.

Here are a few tips to consider before you sit down to watch these lectures in order to make the most of this learning opportunity.


1. If you haven’t already done so I would suggest you download the app on your smartphone, even if you’re not attending in person the app can be handy. If you don't have a smartphone, it is also available for your iPad or PC. If contains the live streaming schedule through the RootsTech.org icon. Click on it and you can easily view this schedule.

2. Proceed to picking out the lectures you wish to watch and mark them in the My Schedule section of the app. Keep in mind these lectures are Mountain Time, so convert to your time zone. For example, those of you in my time zone EDT, there is a 2 hour delay. So the keynote starting a 8:30am MDT will be 10:30am EDT. I like to do all the conversions ahead of time and put them in the schedule so I don't get confused.

3. In the News Feed, you’ll find all the latest posts from the Official Bloggers at RootsTech. This is a great feature because you don’t have to jump all over the internet looking for them; they’re tied up in a nice neat package right in the app.

4. There’s an icon that sends you right to the RootsTech Facebook page if wish to follow the postings there over the next 3 days.

5. If you’re on Twitter be sure to follow the feed available in the app or from your favourite twitter app such as Hootesuite or Tweetdeck. Create a stream for the #RootsTech hashtag and engage in some lively conversations and interaction with those in the lecture hall and many of us watching from home. Be sure to follow @RootsTechConf for twitter updates and news.

6. Plan ahead and grab the syllabus material before the lecture. I’ve included the live stream schedule below and a link to the syllabus for each. Download the documents to your computer or print them out ahead of time. Personally, I’ve save them to Evernote. I will then make my notes in Evernote alongside the document while the lecture is happening. And even though not all the lectures will be available online all the syllabus material is, so peruse the entire conference schedule and download any of the material you may find interesting.

7. Keep an eye on the videos, picture gallery icons. There just might be some great stuff posted here while the conference is happening.

8. Get your headphones ready. I’ll be wearing my wireless headset so I can still have some mobility around the house. (Yes I will look like a geek, but I'm long past worrying about that.) Make sure you go looking for them ahead of time so you’re not frantically searching them out at the last minute. A headset or earphones makes for a much nicer experience if there is a lot of commotion around your house that you need to tune out.

9. If you are busy over these next 3 days and think you might miss a lecture consider listening to it from your smartphone. Seriously, I did this 2 years ago. Plugged in my headphones and listened to a lecture while grocery shopping. Make sure your phone is fully charged in advance.

10. Plan your meals or order takeout and take it easy these next three days. While you may not be able to attend in person, you can still dedicate this time to learn and get the most out of this opportunity. I’ve found all the lectures in years past to be packed with valuable information. Don’t miss out!

There you have it 10 tips to make the most of your next 3 days. I’ll see you in the virtual audience at RootsTech 2013.

Will you be attending the virtual conference this year? Any advice?


Live- Streaming Schedule 

Thursday
8:30 AM
Keynote – Dennis Brimhall, Syd Lieberman, Josh Taylor
11:00 AM
The Future of Genealogy - Thomas MacEntee and panel
Syllabus
1:45 PM
Tell it Again (Story@Home) - Kim Weitkamp
Syllabus
3:00 PM
The Genealogists Gadget Bag - Jill Ball and panel
Syllabus
4:15 PM
Finding the Obscure and Elusive: Geographic Information on the Web - James Tanner
Syllabus
 
Friday
8:30 AM
Keynote - Jyl Pattee and Tim Sullivan
9:45 AM
Researching Ancestors Online - Laura Prescott
Syllabus
11:00 AM
FamilySearch Family Tree - Ron Tanner
Syllabus
1:45 PM
Google Search… and Beyond - Dave Barney
Syllabus
3:00 PM
From Paper Piles to Digital Files - Valerie Elkins
Syllabus
 
Saturday
8:30 AM
Keynote - David Pogue and Gilad Japhet
9:45 AM
Using Technology to Solve Research Problems - Karen Clifford
Syllabus
11:00 AM
Digital Storytelling: More than Bullet Points - Denise Olson
Syllabus








































Monday Morning Mentions



Monday Morning Mentions is an opportunity to reflect on the events of the week at the Armchair Genealogist and in the blogging and book community. Over my morning cappuccino, I will take the opportunity to share with you some of my favourite blogs posts this week and give a nod to my peers.




You can also find me on Facebook. Stop by and leave a message. I often will link some great finds there as well. You can also follow me on twitter at @LynnPal or my twitter paper The Armchair Genealogist Journal.



At the Armchair Genealogist this week, posts included the following:


Need Help With Your Family History Interviews? 

Check out my article in the March issue of the In-Depth Genealogist, Capturing Life Stories through the Family History Interview.


Internet Genealogy – a great genealogy or internet tip that will benefit any armchair genealogist.

This week's mention: 


Footnote Maven returns with her first post in over a year. Thrilled to have her back after a lengthy illness, she is on the mend and back in the saddle. Don't miss her first post to celebrate her 5th Anniversary!  Read Shades Blogiversary- I'm Back! 

Maureen Taylor shared a smartphone camera tip, which in my opinion was pretty cool! Check out Smartphone Camera Tip: Viewing Old Negatives

I can always count on Michele for some very specific and solid advice. This week she's discussing More Effective Searches at Ancestoring's Ask a Genealogist. 

We've all been embracing our Irish ancestry this past week, so here's a few folks who put out some posts to help us chase down those ever frustrating Irish ancestors. 

Carolyn L. Barkley takes A Look at Northern Ireland Research  from GenealogyandFamilyHistory.com 

Finding Irish Church Records from the Genealogy Blog. 

Six Irish Genealogy Websites by Diane Haddad, The Genealogy Insider at  Family Tree Magazine. 



Writing Family History - great advice or information on writing your family history.

This week’s mention:

Biff Barnes sheds some light on the self-publishing process in The Author's Journey : Tech Tools to Self-Publish a Book.  or you could save yourself a few headaches and just hire Biff to do this work for you. 

This week from The Heart and Craft of Life Writing, Sharon writes about a topic that is always top of mind for family historians. Read Above All Cause No Harm

Social Media for the Genealogist - this will include social media advice and learning opportunities from experts both inside and outside of the genealogy industry. 

This week's mention: 

Well of course we need to discuss the whole Google Reader situation. I do rely on it heavily to create Monday Morning Mentions, but I'm not too worried, we will all adjust. Here's a few thoughts from the blogosphere to consider. 

How Author' Can Survive the Death of Google Reader by Caitin Muir over at AuthorMedia. 

Seven Reasons I Picked Feedly to Replace Google Reader by Michael Hyatt. For now I'm with Michael on this one. 


New Genealogy Blog – we will tip our hat to a newcomer who impresses us right out of the box 

This week's mention: 

Mitzi recently joined discussions with our family history writers in The Family History Writing Challenge forum and now I see she's joined Geneabloggers. Mitzi is writing historical fiction based on her Kentucky ancestors. She's sharing her thoughts at MitziSwisher.com. Be sure to stop by and welcome her to the fold. 


Books that Move and Matter - each week we will feature an ebook or print book with the family historian in mind. It may come as a great source of information, for research or writing or playing to our historical interests, or may just be a great read I think genealogists will love.
 
There certainly is a buzz in the air over this new book. I will be putting in my order for a copy


Mastering Genealogical Proof by Tom Jones award-winning genealogical research, writer, editor and educator. 

Currently available for pre-order at the National Genealogical Society  this book is being dubbed as the essential guide  for genealogical research. 


From the NGS site:


 "As a unique textbook on genealogical methods and reasoning in the twenty first century, Mastering Genealogical Proof guides readers in acquiring genealogical skills transcending chronological, ethnic, geopolitical, and religious boundaries." 




Podcasts and Digital Magazines etc.  I've added a new item to Monday Morning Mentions. We will capture all the latest in podcasts, digital magazines and the like right here. 

The March issue of the free digital magazine The In-Depth Genealogist is now out. 

#Genchat this coming! We're discussing Research Trips and Travel, you can find more details here.

This week's episode of Fieldstone Commons by Marian Pierre-Louis covered Records Access and Researching in the 1600's. 

RootsTech 2013 announced the live streaming schedule for those us attending virtually
That starts on Thursday, so make sure you  mark it on your schedule and be sure to jump on twitter during these lectures and we can share our thoughts. #RootsTech 

The Webinar Watch - Each week we will list upcoming webinars mostly in genealogy, but occasionally I come across one for writing or social media I think is beneficial, I'll be sure to share it here. Will also add hangouts to the list. 

This week's webinars: 

Soldiers Veterans Home presented by Richard Sayre and hosted by Georgia Genealogical Society. Monday March 18th. 

Erin in the USA: Irish Research on This Side of the Atlantic presented by Michael Brophy and hosted by Southern California Genealogical Society. Wednesday March 20th. FREE.

Finding Your Irish Ancestors presented by Raymond Naibitt presented by Utah Genealogical Society. Thursday March 21st. FREE. 

Other Great Round-ups

You can find more new genealogy bloggers at Thomas' list of New Genealogy Blogs at Geneabloggers.

For other great reads, Randy at Genea-Musings offers the Best of the Genea-Blogs

Read Friday Finds by Julie Cahill at GenBlog

Dan Curtis, Professional Personal Historian always puts together some interesting selections in Monday's Link Round-Up.

British and Irish Genealogy blog offers lots of goodies, This week brings Genealogy News for Mar 15th.

And Jana Last lists some favorites on Follow Friday -- Fab Finds for Mar 15th 2013 by Jana Last on Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog.

Here's a new round-up to follow, Two Nerdy History Girls offers us a weekly round-up. I think you'll find them fascinating. This week's Breakfast Links: Week of March 11th.
And John at Transylvanian Dutch brings us his Weekly Genealogy Picks.


Also Notable Genealogy Posts, March 16th by Michael Hait at Planting the Seeds. 

Have a great genealogy week, keep researching and writing!
Become a Sponsor of Monday Morning Mentions