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Irish Genealogy News



It’s been awhile since we last discussed Irish Genealogy, if you are just getting started in finding your Irish ancestors then please read The Beginner's series on Irish genealogy. For those like myself, still looking for those ever-evasive Irish records, there are few updates I want to inform you about. As well as a new forum for Irish researchers, and an Irish Genealogy online course.

First up, Ancestry.com has added some data to their site, they include:  

Ireland Catholic Parish Records -
 This database contains indexed images of burial registers from Roman Catholic parishes in Ireland.

·         Ireland, Catholic Parish Baptisms, 1742–1881, Est. Record Count: 275k
·         Ireland, Catholic Parish Marriages and Banns, 1742–1884, Est. Record Count: 120k
·         Ireland, Catholic Parish Deaths, 1742–1881, Est. Record Count: 25k

Ireland Birth, Marriage and Death Records - Civil registration of all births, marriages, and deaths in Ireland began in 1864.

·         Ireland Births and Baptisms, 1620–1911, Est. Record Count: 4 million
·         Ireland Civil Registration Births Index, 1825–1978, Est. Record Count: 9 million
·         Ireland, Civil Registration Marriages Index, 1845–1958, Est. Record Count: 4 million
·         Ireland, Civil Registration Deaths Index, 1864–1958, Est. Record Count: 6 million

>Next irishgenealogy.ie has added additional Roman Catholic records of baptism, marriage and burials for County of Cork and Dublin City. This site is hosted by the Department of Tourism, Culture and Sport. This recent upgrade brings the total number of searchable Church records to nearly 3 million. These records include Counties of Carlow, Cork, Dublin City and Kerry. This is a free website.

This past summer, Find my Past, has added a new forum to their website.

I've checked it out and this is a nicely organized forum. The forum is broken down  into a general discussion area, asking about specific records, asking for help with specific ancestors, places and geography in Ireland, sharing your success stories, and what it means to be Irish.  

You can sort by discussions you have started and discussions you are following. If you like, a particular thread hit the 'Watch This' button, the forum will keep track of all the discussions you’re following and on a separate page all of your own discussions. This is a great addition to this website, check it out! You can sign up at findmypast.ie.

Family Tree University is offering a wonderful course on Irish Research.

Irish Research 201 is designed for researchers who are ready to dig a little deeper into their Irish roots. You’ll learn about resources and techniques that are unique to research in Ireland.  This session begins on Monday and lasts for 4 weeks for the reasonable price of $99.00.  This class is recommended for anyone tracing their Irish ancestry, librarians and volunteers wishing to assist patrons researching their Irish roots and researchers who want to improve their skills in using Irish records.

Here’s what Family Tree University promises you will learn.

  • How to place your ancestors within the context of Ireland’s history and civil infrastructure to create a genealogical research plan
  • How to use three key record groups—censuses, civil registrations, and church records—to find out more about your ancestors
  • How to use land records—including Griffith’s Valuation, a key resource in Irish research—to determine exactly where your ancestors lived
  • Which Irish research techniques and tools are critical to your success in finding out more about your ancestors’ lives?

Interested in learning more about this course or registering, there still a couple days left, click here


2 comments:

  1. Thanks for providing these sources. I've bookmarked this post so I can return to it again (and again) when I delve into my Irish ancestry.

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  2. Thanks for posting this, and for including the link to the Beginners series. I'm trying to cross the pond on my Scots-Irish research and just now realizing that often the Ulster records are all mixed up with all the other Irish records.

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