google-site-verification: google65e716d80989ba07.html The Armchair Genealogist: August 2011

Want to Build a Family History Legacy Book

New Genealogy Bloggers....Who Are You?



Each week I check out the list of new genealogy bloggers created by Thomas at Geneabloggers. I love this list, first because it keeps me abreast of new genealogy blogs, and secondly it helps new bloggers get started and get some much needed attention. I was there once, and giving back by visiting these new blogs is the least I can do.

Each week in my own post Monday Morning Mentions, I generally choose one of those blogs to spotlight besides other blogs that provided some epic posts that week.

 My choice is usually personal; they speak to me on some certain level. Generally, the one I pick seems to have the right combination of a great blog title, interesting blog concept, nice blog design and more importantly great writing.  However, with that being said, 90% of these blogs are not doing something..... they do not tell me who they are, more specifically their name.

A name would be nice, even if only a first name. Nine out of ten new blogs I visit forget to include their name somewhere on their blog. Please, don’t make me look for it. I know if you are a new blogger (remember I’ve been there) that putting your name out into blogosphere can be a little intimidating. Please don’t let it stop you.  If you really want to make some quick inroads into this community, then don’t be afraid to share your full name (we don’t bite, well most of us...most of the time).

Secondly, a picture always goes a long way to making your website personal. I know another scary prospect. No, you can’t wake till you lose that last 10 lbs. Grab a camera, get a friend or family member to take a picture and get it up there. It nice to put a face to the name and the writing.

When I spotlight a blog, and no name is given, I usually like to know whether I should at least reference them as a ‘him’ or ‘her’, sometimes even that is difficult. Sometimes I have to pick it up in their about page, if they reference a husband or wife, then I can generally make an assumption. Really, should I have to be putting my genealogy detective skills to work on your blogs just to find out whether you are male or female? Should I have to work this hard to find out who you are? Most won't. 

I have chosen your blog because you’ve got it going on right out of the gate, yet your still missing one key element, a great ‘about page.’

Many of you have an about page, which is an important start, now make sure your utilizing it to its full potential.  If you’re not sure what to include on your about page here are some suggestions.

Who are you?
What do you do?
When did you start doing what you’re doing?
Where are you?
How are you accomplishing what you claim to do?

Your about page should be a couple of paragraphs, and should address your audience.

 Who is your audience? An about page targets your first time visitors who want to know who and what your website is about, regular visitors who want to know more about you and visitors who may be interested in doing business with you. These are the people who will read your ‘about page’, give them what they are looking for.

 Here's a few examples of 'about pages'  from some genealogy bloggers. 

(Julie is a new genealogy blogger, Marian and Kerry have been kicking around for awhile.) 

New genealogy bloggers, spend a few minutes on your ‘about page’, let us know who you are, so we can welcome you to the fold with open arms.

Monday Morning Mentions


Monday Morning Mentions is an opportunity to reflect on what has been happening at the Armchair Genealogist this past week over my morning cappuccino and give a nod to some of my peers who captured my attention in the blogging community.


If you want to see what ranked in my Google Reader this week click, The Armchair Genealogist's Google Reader Highlights 

You can also find me on Facebook. Stop by and leave a message. I often will link some great finds there as well.  You can also follow me on twitter at @LynnPal or my twitter paper The Armchair Genealogist Journal. 

At the Armchair Genealogist this week, posts included the following: 

Each week I’m choosing four blogs that deserve a shout out, they will be in the form of 4 categories, Internet Genealogy, Family History Writing, a New Blog and a blog that posted a great old-fashioned family recipe. OK some weeks I choose more than 4 just because it to hard to pick just one, and it's my blog so I can change the rules. 

Internet Genealogy – a great genealogy or internet tip that will benefit any armchair genealogist.
This week’s mention: 

Anyone researching online has at one time or another looked at research on a shared family tree. I think Chris Witten did a great job this week in addressing some concerns in his post Can You Trust a Private Company offering a Shared Family Tree? on Kerry Scott's blog, Clue Wagon. Don't forget to read the comments. 


Kerry also shares a great post on how she overcame a very 'large' problem in her post What to Do WIth a 547-page Probate File. Quick thinking Kerry, the results look great. 




Writing Family History - great advice or information on writing your family history. 
This week’s mention:

This week I want to spotlight a blog that has shared a very moving personal story. This is the kind of story that will move you to tears. It is a story about  Judy's  journey to find the truth behind the disappearance of her grandmother, aunt and uncle. At Judy's blog Provenance, she shares her discovery in the post Evidence. We are honored that Judy has shared this story with us. I encourage you to leave her a comment and let Judy know that the discovery of her family has not only brought closure to her family but has moved a community. We will all remember Gitel, Berta and Norbert, they are no longer a number, they have come out of the shadows, that is the power of sharing a story. 




New Genealogy Blog – we will tip our hat to a newcomer who impresses us right out of the box
This week’s mention:  


Attics and Old Lace caught my attention this week, besides the great title, Liz is using this blog to work through her boxes of treasures that remain delinquent and unscanned.  Her blog will document her journey through her treasure boxes. 

Family Recipe - a blog that makes us want to eat, and offers up a great old-fashioned family recipe to share on Family Recipe Friday.

This week's mention: 


Kathryn at Reflections shares some candy recipes belonging to her husband's Grandfather who owned a candy store.  I love the little box we would present the candy in for customer's orders. 

You can find more newcomers at Thomas' list of New Genealogy Blogs at Geneabloggers.  


For other great reads, Randy at Genea-Musings offers the Best of the Genea-Blogs


Stop by the Week in Review by John at Transylvanian Dutch for another great round-up. 

Dan Curtis, Professional Personal Historian always puts together some interesting selections in Monday's Link Round-Up
Have a great genealogy week, keep researching and writing!

Family Recipe Friday - Nonna's Sauce



(This post is from my archives as I'm busy canning this year's harvest, hope you enjoy!)
It's harvest time, and that means for me canning season. Every year at this time, I turn approximately 4 bushels of tomatoes in tomato sauce. I know for many of you the idea of canning your own fruits and vegetables is an arduous task. However, in the middle of winter when I'm enjoying the fruits of my labour, and the hardwork is behind me, I'm am grateful for having done the task.

The ritual of canning my own tomatoes each fall is a salute to my Italian mother-in-law, and the generations of women who came before her. I'm sharing with you today her recipe for canning tomato sauce. I consider this recipe to be my greatest treasure. Nonna passed away several years ago and it was the quick thinking of my sister-in-law to it write down her recipe and her knowledge, all inherited bits of information from her mother and grandmothers. Josephine was born in  Caserta, in the Campania region of Italy. My sister-in-law and myself took our turn learning the ropes and I continue the tradition today.


Today, with so much talk of eating healthy and clean,  there is no better time to consider turning back the clock to the days of our ancestors and take up the lost art of preserving and canning our own fruits and vegetables.

Nonna's Sauce

  • Your tomatoes should come fresh from your local farmer if not from your own garden. Roma tomatoes or if you can get your hands on San Marzano tomatoes are ideal.
  • Wash your tomatoes genereously, remove the stem and any dark or white spots.
  • Hand cut the tomatoes and put them into a blender.
  • Pour the blended tomatoes into the separating machine. This machine will separate the skin and seeds on one side and send the juice in a pot on the otherside.
  • Once you have filled a large pot with juice you can begin boiling it on the stove. You can add some salt at this time. This juice will boil for a couple of hours until you are happy with the consistency.
Meanwhile I wash my jars and lids in the dishwasher on the sanitize setting. If they finish before the sauce I will then hold them in the oven keeping them warm and sanitized until the sauce is ready. The lids I boil on the stove and hold in the hot water until ready to jar.

Before you jar place 3-4 fresh basil leaves (from your garden) and fill the jars with the hot sauce. Leave at least 1 inch head room. Attach lids and secure tightly, turn upside down to sit and seal.

When you are ready to use your sauce.

Saute up a little chopped garlic in olive oil, add a jar of sauce, let simmer for 20-30 minutes adding again some fresh or "frozen fresh" basil about 1/2 way through your cooking time along with kosher salt to taste.

This will make a lovely marinara sauce for your favourite pasta.

10 Ideas for Every Genealogist's Bucket List


                                                                                           

    1. Travel to a least one or more of your ancestral villages, the more exotic the better because let’s face it; it’s a trip away from your computer screen.

    2. Attend a National Genealogy Conference – you’ve read about them but never been able to attend. Plan a conference today, you will walk away with a spring in your step and a motivation like you never experienced, and a few new friends to boot. It’s a trip as well, so how could you go wrong, 2012 is in Cincinnati, Ohio. 
    3. Travel to Salt Lake City Utah and research in the largest family history library in the world. The LDS library is the Mecca for genealogists. Warning one trip will not be enough. Here's a tip attend the   Rootstech Conference in Feb 2012 and you can kill two birds with one stone. 

    4. Publish Your Family History – you didn’t think I was going to let this opportunity past with out a little lecture on writing your story. What’s the use of all that research if not to write and publish your family stories for future generations? Stop procrastinating and start writing.


    5. To Read all the great genealogy books, family histories, novels and blogs that are the cornerstone of family history. There is so much to read and so little time. Make a list of those must reads, and commit some time everyday to reading.


    6. To have a well organized Family Tree – we all preach the proper, organizing your genealogy, citing all your facts, a nice filing system with colour co-ordinated folders, well-organized digital files, all backed up safely. The truth is that would make us the most perfect genealogist. Let's be real researching is far more exciting then organizing. However, keep plugging away at it, one can dream.


    7. To Make Money chasing other people’s ancestors – we love it so much we do it for friends and family but it really would be nice to make a little money at it. Hang out your shingle, get certified, it won’t make you rich but it might pay a bill or two.


    8. To publish an article or book based on your research and experience. Don’t be shy, plenty of family history magazines are looking for great articles from family historians. Write it, rewrite, polish it and send it off, what have you to lose. Want to go big, write that novel, that how to book, in this day and age there is nothing stopping you.


    9. To discover living relatives that you didn’t know existed – this is my favourite, I dream of traveling to my family’s homeland and discovering living relatives of those who stayed behind. They open up their homes and memory boxes for sharing. My family history journey would be complete.


    10. Fill in the blank with your favourite bucket list wish, add it to the comments below!






Monday Morning Mentions

Monday Morning Mentions is an opportunity to reflect on what has been happening at the Armchair Genealogist this past week over my morning cappuccino and give a nod to some of my peers who captured my attention in the blogging community.


If you want to see what ranked in my Google Reader this week click, The Armchair Genealogist's Google Reader Highlights 

You can also find me on Facebook. Stop by and leave a message. I often will link some great finds there as well.  You can also follow me on twitter at @LynnPal or my twitter paper The Armchair Genealogist Journal. 

At the Armchair Genealogist this week, posts included the following: 
Recent  Posts include: 
Each week I’m choosing four blogs that deserve a shout out, they will be in the form of 4 categories, Internet Genealogy, Family History Writing, a New Blog and a blog that posted a great old-fashioned family recipe. OK some weeks I choose more than 4 just because it to hard to pick just one, and it's my blog so I can change the rules. 

Internet Genealogy – a great genealogy or internet tip that will benefit any armchair genealogist
This week’s mention: 


At Destination: Austin Family, Thomas shared My Favourite Newspaper Tools for Genealogy. This is definitely a nice list to bookmark for your online genealogy resources. 




Writing Your Family History – great advice or information on writing your family history
This week’s mention:

Treasure Chest Maps has laid out a challenge for its readers, Writing Seven Chapters in Your Life Story is a great way to stop procrastinating and put words to paper. Check it out, it just might be the push you need. 


I also enjoy this little writing tip by Be Kind Rewrite. This week's post 5 Ways to Find Your Voice is great little post to help you put personality behind your writing. 


New Genealogy Blog – we will tip our hat to a newcomer who impresses us right out of the box
This week’s mention:  

Write Family Stories, is a new blog, where the author is taking on the task of writing her family stories, and sharing her experiences and knowledge along the way. Tune in she just may inspire you to do the same. 

Family Recipe - a blog that makes us want to eat, and offers up a great old-fashioned family recipe to share on Family Recipe Friday.

This week's mention: 

Tomato Soup  was at the top of my yum list this week. I love, love, love Tomato Soup and it has been a long time since I made it from scratch, with tomatoes in season I may bypass the canned tomatoes but this recipe has me excited, I will keep you posted Jo. Check out the cute story that goes along with this recipe at Images Past blog.


You can find more newcomers at Thomas' list of New Genealogy Blogs at Geneabloggers.  


For other great reads, Randy at Genea-Musings offers the Best of the Genea-Blogs. 


Stop by the Week in Review by John at Transylvanian Dutch for another great round-up. 

Dan Curtis, Professional Personal Historian always puts together some interesting selections in Monday's Link Round-Up
Have a great genealogy week, keep researching and writing!

Please Excuse My Mess

This weekend, The Armchair Genealogist is under going some design changes. Please excuse the mess as a result, not
all fonts, colouring etc converted over as smoothly as I had hoped.  I apologize for anything that is not conforming to the program. I'm still playing with the colouring and layout etc. It may be a few days as I work through everything. However for the most part everything should be working fine. My goal besides keeping things fresh and inviting, was to streamline and simplify the look and to hopefully make the posts easier to read. I would love your feedback, good, bad and ugly.

Writing and Selling Your Memoir

I recently came across this lovely little gem and considering that few things in life are rarely free (see yesterday’s post). I felt the need to share this right away before it disappeared.


This is for my writing friends, those of you looking to turn your family history stories into a book. Writing and Selling Your Memoir by Paula Balzer is a wealth of information, published by FW Media, this is a great read for anyone looking to write a memoir and or a family history story. 

Paula identifies how to structure your story, how to use dialogue and pacing. She addresses the always-sticky situation of truthfulness in a memoir. She also goes on to address creating a platform, finding an agent and many other must knows to writing a memoir.

Paula is a literary agent in New York City, a self-proclaimed lover of  memoirs; she brings her passion and talent to this knowledge packed book. 


In the first 55 pages, be are swept up in her contagious passion, but she doesn't take long in getting you busy. Very quickly, Paula explains in clear uncertain terms the hook, and how to find yours. 

If you like the first 55 pages that you can download below then be sure to pick up the full-length book, Writing and Selling Your Memoir: How to Craft Your Life Story So Somebody Will Actually Want to Read It.

This ebook has been reprinted here under the following Creative Commons Attribution License
Writing & Selling your Memoir

Free Genealogy - Is there really such a thing?



Type ‘free genealogy’ into google and you will face 14,900,000 results.

When I first started my research, I thought that this little hobby wasn’t going to cost me much. I wonder how many of you felt the same?  I think anyone new researching their family history would be excited to learn that so much free genealogy is available, I also think they would be misled. 

  There is no such thing as free genealogy. Sure, there are many wonderful websites offering free transcribed data. There is plenty of free information about researching genealogy in the form of websites and blogs. There are plenty of places to grow your family tree... free, however, usually with restrictions, and they usually want you to upgrade to a premium account that will cost. (we won't even discuss the recent Geni.com fiasco.) However, when it comes down to the nuts and bolts of finding some hardcore documents, primary and secondary sources, there are no such thing as free.

In terms of the internet, most primary documents are locked behind subscription walls. Secondly, even if you’re lucky enough to find a primary or secondary document on the internet for “free”, it all comes at a price... your time.

Outside of the internet, unless you’re among a minority where your ancestors lived in your current town, you’re looking at extensive traveling, to cemeteries, archives, land record offices etc.etc. None of which is free. Let’s not forget the time to accomplish all of this. Why do you think so many of us spend decades chasing our ancestors documents – the time and expense, but we love it just the same. 

Do You Have a Budget?

 Many of us are on restricted budgets and time restraints, like laundry and soccer practices and a little thing we call a mortgage. Personally, I probably spend somewhere between $500.00-$1000.00 a year for database subscriptions, software, local travel, books, microfilms, photocopies etc., the basics of just keeping my personal research ongoing. This doesn’t include any conferences or large genealogy research trips. How much do you spend?  

In terms of time... let’s just say a lot, I put it in the same category as revealing my weight, I just can't say the number out loud.  

When it comes to spending your money, you have to know when the price will justify the result, and often times that is hard to know in advance.

Best Buys

For instance, I was looking for information on my Polish ancestors. I had a deadline for a family history book. I spent $500.00 with a professional researcher in Poland and got to the heart of what I was looking for in a matter of a couple of weeks. Could I have found this information for myself? Certainly. These particular parish records were microfilmed with the LDS. However, by going thru a researcher and paying my money I got 15 copies of original documents along with accompanying translations. (I was able to recoup the expense in the book price).

After seeing the documents it became clear to me I would have never have found them on my own. First, they were understandably in Polish; secondly, they were in an old handwriting script. Even if they were staring me straight in the face, I would not have known what I was looking at.

This worked out well for me, but plenty of times, I have placed my money on the table with no results.  This usually revolves around my Irish ancestors.  I’m sure you could tell of tale or two of similar circumstance, of money out the window.

I think the majority of us spend plenty of money on travel, and databases, we might scrounge a few things free – but for the most part, time will be your biggest expense.

Occasionally you get an email from a distant cousin who might drop something into your lap, (who doesn’t love that) or you stumble across something in the most unlikely place, and we might consider that “free.” How many of us have not been elated when this has happened, convincing ourselves we just got something for free.  Let’s be honest, we've been pounding the pavement for years, those little surprises did come at a price.

So newbies, I’m not trying to discourage you but don’t believe them when they say 'free genealogy', nothing in life is free and especially not genealogy. I would rather you start your genealogy knowing what you’re getting into, don’t be misled and be prepared for the long haul.

Genealogy is time consuming; it requires endless hours of searching even with subscription databases.  Many start and then reality arrives and their research falls by the way side. Genealogy takes time, it takes travel and it takes money but finding an ancestor is priceless. Ask anyone in the biz, we wouldn't trade it for anything. 

 Do you have a yearly budget to spend on genealogy?  Do you have tips and tricks to keep your expenses down?  Feel free to share in comments your “best buys” or “money wasted” story?


Monday Morning Mentions



Monday Morning Mentions is an opportunity to reflect on what has been happening at the Armchair Genealogist this past week over my morning cappuccino and give a nod to some of my peers who captured my attention in the blogging community.


If you want to see what ranked in my Google Reader this week click, The Armchair Genealogist's Google Reader Highlights 

You can also find me on Facebook. Stop by and leave a message. I often will link some great finds there as well. 

You can also follow me on twitter at @LynnPal or my twitter paper The Armchair Genealogist Journal. 

At the Armchair Genealogist this week, posts included the following: 

Recent  Posts include: 



Each week I’m choosing four blogs that deserve a shout out, they will be in the form of 4 categories, Internet Genealogy, Family History Writing, a New Blog and a blog that posted a great old-fashioned family recipe. OK some weeks I choose more than 4 just because it to hard to pick just one, and it's my blog so I can change the rules. 

Internet Genealogy – a great genealogy or internet tip that will benefit any armchair genealogist
This week’s mention:

Definitely this little website, 1DollarScan is a worthwhile bookmark for all genealogists. I learned about it this week from Dick Eastman, in his post Scan and Digitize Your Books for $1.00. Prepare to be amazed!


Writing Your Family History – great advice or information on writing your family history
This week’s mention

In Stories to Tell this week, I learned about Bruce Bothwell, who turned his father's journals as a hobo in the 1920's into a print book.Publishing Journals and Letters with Bruce Bothwell is a great podcast about his experience in the writing and self-publishing world. Learn from his mistakes and be sure to look up his book, On the Tramp. 


Julie at GenWriter shared with us this week another great post, 4 Resources for Writing Your Family History which include 3 books and a webinar. 




New Genealogy Blog – we will tip our hat to a newcomer who impresses us right out of the box
This week’s mention:  

I love, love, love the premise of this blog, The Brick Wall Protocol. This is great for those of us who need some advanced help with our brick walls. The steps are laid out very clearly so you can easily apply them to your own situation. I'm giving it a try on my Irish roadblock. Jerry Jones is the author of multiple blogs and clearly has thought this out very carefully, it has a clear purpose. At the risk of repeating myself, Love it Jerry. 


Family Recipe - a blog that makes us want to eat, and offers up a great old-fashioned family recipe to share on Family Recipe Friday.
This week's mention: 

Mountain Genealogists always has great recipes to share and this iced tea recipe by Grandma Bean is no exception. I'm going to give it a try only thing I'm missing is the big ol' porch swing. 

You can find more newcomers at Thomas' list of New Genealogy Blogs at Geneabloggers.  


For other great reads, Randy at Genea-Musings offers the Best of the Genea-Blogs. 


 Stop by the Week in Review by John at Transylvanian Dutch for another great round-up. 

Have a great genealogy week, keep researching and writing!

Family Recipe Friday - Helen's Polish Family Recipes

I came across this little gem the other day and just needed to share it. Not only does it tug at my heartstrings, because of my Polish roots, but these recipes are handwritten, and seem quite authentic. In 2009, at the time of publishing of this lovely little book, Helen Bochnik was 88 years old. I am particularly fond of pierogies, cabbage rolls and angel wings. If you dare attempt the jellied pigs feet please let me know.

Here is Helen's Polish Family Recipes that she is happy to share. Please note at the bottom of the window you can download this quaint little recipe book for your own use or to share with friends.

(This recipe book is covered by the following copyright license )



Helen's Polish Family Recipes

My Children - Rating My Favourites



The other day I was taking an online survey for genealogists. Part way through the survey I came across a question that stopped me in my tracks. I thought I would share it with you and get your opinion. 


The question started out simply enough. Check off the sources you have used from the following.  
  • Obituaries
  • Newspaper articles, announcements and advertisements
  • Old atlases and maps
  • Living relatives
  • Court records
  • Old photographs
  • Family records and heirlooms, including a family bible
  • Church records
  • Family Search, International Genealogical Index or Ancestral file (LDS resources)
  • Other online databases (Ancestry, FindMyPast, Scotland’s People)
  • Professional Genealogists
  • Land Records
  • Military records
  • Censuses
  • Tax and Assessment Rolls
  • Wills, Estates, Probate records
  • Gravestones and cemetery records
  • Local Histories
  • Social Security Records
  • Telephone books, city directories, provincial or state directories
  • Funeral Home Records
  • Government Vital Records – births, marriages, deaths
  • Ships passenger’s lists
  • Immigration Records
  • Google maps, Google street view 

Needless to say, I checked most all of them.....right....as any good genealogist would.

However, the next question left me a bit dazed and confused.

Of the above listed sources which were the most important and why?

Huh..... for a genealogist this is like asking a mother to choose which one of her babies, her precious children are her favourites. In fact they wanted me to pick my top three. I had to give this some thought, there were a few things I had to consider. 

It depends on which one of my family surnames I would be taking into account. Each surname brings its own set of special challenges.  As so each one of my children.

It depends on what point in my research I am referencing, some documents were more important in the early going as opposed to now. Do I choose based on now or way back at the beginning?  We all know those babies were so cute in the early days, lest we forget the sleepless nights and diapers.

Then, I just can’t get past the fact that no document is an island. Any genealogist, worth their salt knows that it takes a combination of documents to tell the story. No document on its own can singularly take on the responsibility of your family history,  just as it takes the unique personalities of my children to create our family.

Then I tried to think if I only had access to one document which one would that be? Again a tough call because each ancestor in my tree has revealed themselves through a variety of documents.  Each one brings it strengths to the equation just like all my children. Each one has their own personality and although they all have their strengths and weaknesses, you love them all equally. How could I every choose. 

For instance, I think most would say vital statistics are very important, however, I have found more information on census documents and in obits then in some birth certificates. However, without a vital record, it’s hard to know for sure your chasing the right person.

Then I could say passenger lists, because for some of my family, passenger lists and linking them to their homeland, and uncovering the story of their arrival has been an important part of my research.

How do I choose, and why should I have to? Well I did against my better judgement.

1.       My first choice was passenger lists, I have found a couple that have really opened the door to a few of my ancestors and I am desperately looking for a couple more that I hope will do the same.  I’m afraid they just simply don’t exist.

2.       My second choice is vital statistics, as stated earlier; they really do help you to know if you’re following the right person. However, I have found a few birth certificates that frankly still left me wondering.


      My third choice is  census documents – let’s face it they really do contain a wealth of information, and by putting several of them together; you really begin to see a person’s life, an entire family and a community. Hmmm..... maybe census documents should have been first, now I’m rethinking this.


What do you think?  If you had to rate your babies, your precious genealogy sources, what would be your top three?


Monday Morning Mentions



Monday Morning Mentions is an opportunity to reflect on what has been happening at the Armchair Genealogist this past week over my morning cappuccino and give a nod to some of my peers who captured my attention in the blogging community.


If you want to see what ranked in my Google Reader this week click, The Armchair Genealogist's Google Reader Highlights 

You can also find me on Facebook. Stop by and leave a message. I often will link some great finds there as well. 

You can also follow me on twitter at @LynnPal or my twitter paper The Armchair Genealogist Journal. 

At the Armchair Genealogist this week, posts included the following: 

Recent  Posts include: 



Each week I’m choosing four blogs that deserve a shout out, they will be in the form of 4 categories, Internet Genealogy, Family History Writing, a New Blog and a blog that posted a great old-fashioned family recipe. OK some weeks I choose more than 4 just because it to hard to pick just one, and it's my blog so I can change the rules. 

Internet Genealogy – a great genealogy or internet tip that will benefit any armchair genealogist
This week’s mention:

This week I want to bring your attention to GenWriter by Julie Cahill Tarr. Julie is a genealogist who specializes in writing, editing and graphic design. Her new blog caught my attention this week with  Find Your Research Mojo  stop by an find your motivation. 


Marian is getting ready for a research trip and has shared some great advice for getting your genealogy ready for the trip in Planning a Research Trip at Marian's Roots and Rambles

Writing Your Family History – great advice or information on writing your family history
This week’s mention:


Resources for Young Writers by the Creative Penn is my pick for writing advice this week. This post is direct towards teenagers who are interested in writing, however, I wasn't surprised to learn that the advice in this post transcends all ages. Check it out. 


New Genealogy Blog – we will tip our hat to a newcomer who impresses us right out of the box
This week’s mention:  

This week's pick for new blog goes to Google+ for Genealogists by Dan Lynch. Dan Lynch is probably most famous for his book Google Your Family Tree, one the many genealogy books on my bookshelf.  Now Dan brings his expertise to Google+ learning.  Check it out, you can catch up on the posts and learn a little about Google+ each week without being overwhelmed. I learned about Sparks this week. 

Family Recipe - a blog that makes us want to eat, and offers up a great old-fashioned family recipe to share on Family Recipe Friday.
This week's mention: 

Tis the season for fresh corn so how could I resist Mountain Genealogists recipe for Fireplace Roasted Corn.


You can find more newcomers at Thomas' list of New Genealogy Blogs at Geneabloggers.  


For other great reads, Randy at Genea-Musings offers the Best of the Genea-Blogs. 


 Greta does a great job at Greta’s Genealogy Bog, she offers the Follow Friday Newsletter each week, click here for this week’s edition


Stop by the Week in Review by John at Transylvanian Dutch for another great round-up. 

Have a great genealogy week, keep researching and writing!